antikythera-astronomy:

Where You’re Blind
Cover or close your left eye
Take a step away from your computer
Stare at the black dot above with your right eye
Hold you right thumb out at arm’s length
Place the tip of your thumb over where you see the black dot
Slowly more your thumb away to the right but keep looking at the dot
At about 15˚, the tip of your thumb will disappear
If you move your thumb up or down it will come back into view, but keeping it on the horizontal line, you can trace out exactly the size and place of your blind spot.
This is the region of your eye that has absolutely no light receptors and is literally blind. This is because the light collected by the receptors elsewhere leave the retina at that region and carry the information along a nerve to the brain.

antikythera-astronomy:

Where You’re Blind

  • Cover or close your left eye
  • Take a step away from your computer
  • Stare at the black dot above with your right eye
  • Hold you right thumb out at arm’s length
  • Place the tip of your thumb over where you see the black dot
  • Slowly more your thumb away to the right but keep looking at the dot
  • At about 15˚, the tip of your thumb will disappear

If you move your thumb up or down it will come back into view, but keeping it on the horizontal line, you can trace out exactly the size and place of your blind spot.

This is the region of your eye that has absolutely no light receptors and is literally blind. This is because the light collected by the receptors elsewhere leave the retina at that region and carry the information along a nerve to the brain.

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday.

Saluden Muchachxs, saluden.

(via frijoliz)

(via unclewhisky)

(via buttlazer)

Note to self: No more peanut butter before TRX class. 

For the love of sandwiches, can we all please stop attributing the “beauty blah blah strangeness in the proportion” quote to Poe?  It was fucking Bacon and Poe misquoted him. Thank you. 

phoeni-xx:

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Animated Graphite Self-Portrait by T.S. Abe

Tumblr.

UK-based fashion illustrator and designer T.S. Abe created this fantastic animated self-portrait from a series 15 individual graphite drawings. Abe says this is the first in a series of moving portraits she intends to draw and also mentions this is her first foray into animation. You can follower her most recent work on Tumblr.

Text Via Colossal With Thanks

i’ve been waiting for this to surface

(via xxcuzxme)

Noche en Blanco. A pop-up potluck dinner with a thousand people dressed all in white in the middle of the street. Downtown Tucson, 2014.

Noche en Blanco. A pop-up potluck dinner with a thousand people dressed all in white in the middle of the street. Downtown Tucson, 2014.

(via luc4)

I had a shitty, annoying day.  I’m gonna go play some pinball.